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Admiral’s Row Update

Admiral’s Row on the edge of the Brooklyn Navy Yard is in danger of being lost. MAS will attend a meeting tomorrow at which the negotiations between the National Guard, the owner of the property, and the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation (BNYDC) will discuss the buildings’ future. The meeting is part of the federally-mandated Section 106 process that requires federal agencies to study the impact of their actions on important historic buildings.

MAS has been a part of the Section 106 process and has developed alternatives to demolishing the buildings that show it is possible to preserve them while also accommodating the Navy Yard’s program. In March, rumors surfaced that the National Guard may require the Navy Yard to retain only the Timber Shed and one of the houses on the site, which MAS believes is an inadequate solution.

This video explains these issues in more detail, including the buildings’ unique history, and why they should be saved. You can help us save Admiral’s Row.

To join us in advocating to save Admiral’s Row, write to the National Guard and let them know that these buildings are important to preserve and that MAS has shown that it is possible to retain the historic buildings on the Admiral’s Row site while also allowing for the construction of a much-needed supermarket and new retail and industrial space. You can also write to the elected officials who represent the site.  These include:

MAS has been working with several partners in our advocacy for saving Admirals Row. Among the groups are the National Trust for Historic Preservation, New York Landmarks ConservancyHistoric Districts Council, Professional Archeologists of New York City, Pratt Center for Community Development, Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn Partnership, Fort Greene Association, Landmarks Committee, Society of Clinton Hill Landmarks Committee.

Check www. mas.org/admiralsrow for updates.

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[...] is hardly a lone voice. The Municipal Art Society, the New York Landmarks Conservancy and the Historic Districts Council have all pleaded with the [...]