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Favorite Places to Walk? Favorite Places to Roll?

Family Walking Along a ParkIn preparation for the Jane Jacobs Forum, we want to hear from you about one of your favorite walks. The walk can be in any of the boroughs of New York City. It can be a walk on your way to work or school or when running errands or when out for a ramble. Also, where would you like to walk, but can’t?

Likewise, if you use a wheelchair, where do you like to go? And, where would you like to roll, but can’t?

Here is a response from Dan Icolari, an inveterate walker who lives in St. George, Staten Island.

A favorite walk:

My favorite walk is about 7 miles. It goes through Snug Harbor, Clove Lakes and Silver Lake parks and through the neighborhoods of St. George, New Brighton, West Brighton and Tompkinsville on varied terrain.

Likewise, if you use a wheelchair, where do you like to go? And, where would you like to roll, but can’t?

Who: Dan Icolari, an inveterate walker who lives in St. George, Staten Island.

My favorite walk:
My favorite walk is about 7 miles. It goes through Snug Harbor, Clove Lakes and Silver Lake parks and through the neighborhoods of St. George, New Brighton, West Brighton and Tompkinsville on varied terrain.

Where I would like to walk and can’t:

If you tend to walk long distances, as I do, you start to see how totally our streets and roadways have been given over to automobiles. This is nowhere more true, ironically, than in the Greenbelt, which is far friendlier to cars than to people––who don’t pollute the air and take up less space. Specifically:

Two summers ago (and I’ve been back since–no positive change), I walked from my house to the edge of the Greenbelt on Manor Road, just (south?) of the Jewish Community Center. There is no sidewalk, there is no path; there is only a narrow ditch. Drivers are so unaccustomed to having to share what is, after all, a public roadway that they yelled at me and in some cases intimidated me by driving perilously close to me with no warning. My taxes help to maintain the roads that bisect the Greenbelt, but I use them at my peril because I don’t come with wheels and a motor attached.

Who: from someone who uses an electric wheelchair and finds severe limitations in a conveyance with wheels and motor who wishes to remain anonymous.

My favorite rolling walk:

The Bronx Botanical Garden, which has wonderful accessibility, including on the trams.

Where I would like to roll, but can’t:

The subways, in order to reach more of the city more quickly. Subways with elevators are accessible for manual wheelchairs, but not for electric wheelchairs. An electric wheelchair cannot move across a gap between platform and car, nor when there is a difference in level between platform and car. One can only get into and out of a subway car in an electric wheelchair with the assistance of other passengers.

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