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Wednesday, January 7 Lecture Postponed to January 14

prospect heights historic row houses italianate brooklyn new york architectureDue to emergency surgery, architectural historian Francis Morrone will be unable to give the first of his four lectures on Architecture and Changing Lifestyles this Wednesday, January 7. Instead, his short course will begin on Wednesday, January 14 and end on Monday, February 9. Apologies for the short notice. It was unavoidable. The revised schedule (reservations requested):
  1. The Beginnings of Suburbanization Wednesday, January 14, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. Reserve your place online or call 212-935-2075.
  2. Beyond Tenements: Apartment Houses for the Middle & Upper Classes Wednesday, January 28, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. Reserve your place online or call 212-935-2075.
  3. Gentrification Begins: Row House Renovations and Stable Conversions Wednesday, February 4, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. Reserve your place online or call 212-935-2075.
  4. Deluxe Apartments in the Sky Monday, February 9, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. Reserve your place online or call 212-935-2075.
All with reservations will be contacted for rescheduling or refunds. Those with other questions about the series should contact Tamara Coombs, Director of Programs & Tours at 212-935-3960 or tcoombs [at] mas.org. New Yorkers’ lifestyles have changed continually over the years, constantly upsetting our notions of what it means to be a New Yorker. Many of the lifestyle changes had an architectural counterpart. In four illustrated lectures, architectural historian Francis Morrone will examine four episodes of lifestyle change in New York history, from the beginnings of suburbanization in the 1830s to the move of middle-class and upper-class New Yorkers into apartment buildings beginning in the 1870s and 1880s, to the row-house renovation movement of the early 20th century and, finally, the intensive development of new high-rise apartment buildings in the 1950s and 1960s.