May 2006
M T W T F S S
« Apr   Jun »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Archive for May, 2006

Streetscapes: The Newsrack Nuisance

newsracks clutterFar too often, the city’s newsracks serve more as garbage bins and hosts for graffiti than as providers of publications. Despite the passage of a law meant to regulate the design and placement of newsracks, dilapidated models clutter our sidewalks. You can help curb this blight, and help the Municipal Art Society and its partners in the New York City Newsrack Safety Committee demonstrate to City Hall that its current regulation of newsracks isn’t working. Continue Reading>>

MAS to City: Study Community’s Plan for the Former Con Ed Site

con ed aerial illustrationThe city has a unique opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to community-based planning by officially studying the alternative plan for the former Con Ed site that Manhattan’s Community Board Six produced. The community’s plan — which, unlike the developer’s plan, calls for real waterfront access, meaningful public open space and reasonably scaled buildings — has been endorsed by all the elected officials who represent the area. Continue Reading>>

Penn Station: Building a Landmark for a New Century

new penn station front renderingNew Yorkers can collectively exhale as the long awaited conversion of the Farley Post Office into a new Penn Station has finally received the green light. On October 8, Governor Pataki and the U.S. Postal Service reached an agreement for the sale of the post office to the State of New York. “This agreement clears the way for a new Penn Station on the grand scale envisioned by Senator Moynihan so many years ago,” said Kent Barwick, president of the Society. When the senator’s brilliant idea almost died in 1998 as the victim of compromise “halfway plans,” the Society’s volunteer architects drew up a detailed, ambitious master plan for a national transportation gateway, retail arcade and civic center. Concerned Society members and other citizens lobbied the Mayor, the Governor and the White House and the project stayed alive. Continue Reading>>