MAS Presents: Crime + Punishment

Examining the Role of Policing Today

Join MAS and Film Director, Stephen Maing, for a special screening of the Brendan Gill Prize-winning and Emmy-nominated film, Crime + Punishment, hosted at the Ford Foundation Center for Social Justice.

Crime + Punishment is a moving and carefully observed work that examines policing in New York City from the perspective of courageous officers who risk everything when they decide to expose racially discriminatory practices by the NYPD. The film reveals the complexity of our most pressing urban matters, from the day-to-day demands of being a police officer to community-driven protests in response to highly charged issues. We see what happens when 12 officers break the infamous “wall of silence.” In this captivating cinematic investigation, we gain a deeper understanding of the everyday problems that result in disastrous consequences for communities of color. Amidst a class action lawsuit over illegal policing quotas, Crime + Punishment unfolds as a masterful example of filmmaking, both in craft and content. It was winner of Sundance’s Special Award for Social Impact and is nominated for a 2019 Emmy for Outstanding Social Issues Documentary. The film was produced with the support of JustFilms | Ford Foundation.

6:15 PM Doors; 6:30 PM Welcome Remarks + Screening
Q&A with Director Stephen Maing and Officers from the NYPD 12 to follow

Free and open to the public.
Advance registration is required for security purposes.
Registration will close on Tuesday, September 17 at noon.

Event registration has now closed. No day-of registration permitted.

Wednesday, September 18
6:30 PM — 9:00 PM

Ford Foundation Center for Social Justice
Ford Family Auditorium
320 East 43rd Street, New York, NY 10017
(Enter at 42nd Street and 2nd Avenue)

Nearest Subways: 4/5/6/7 at Grand Central – 42nd Street

Tickets:
Free!

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About Stephen Maing (Director, Crime + Punishment)

Stephen Maing is an Emmy-nominated Brooklyn-based filmmaker. In 2019, he was awarded the Brendan Gill Prize by MAS for his most recent feature – a remarkably powerful documentary titled Crime + Punishment. Other projects of his include feature documentary, High Tech, Low Life, which chronicled the story of two of China’s first dissident citizen-journalists fighting state-monitored censorship and was broadcast nationally on PBS’ award-winning series P.O.V. He has directed films for the New York Times, Time Magazine, The Nation, The Intercept, and Field of Vision. His short film, The Surrender, produced with Academy Award winner Laura Poitras, documented State Department intelligence analyst Stephen Kim’s harsh prosecution under the Espionage Act. It received a 2016 World Press Photo Award for Best Long Form Documentary and was nominated for a 2016 Emmy Award for Outstanding Short Documentary. He is a fellow of the Sundance Institute’s Documentary Film Program and recipient of the International Documentary Association’s inaugural Enterprise Investigative Journalism grant as well as a 2016 John Jay/Harry Frank Guggenheim Reporting Fellow. He is co-directing a forthcoming documentary on national identity and teaches a summer course in documentary cinematography at Massachusetts College of Art & Design.

About the Brendan Gill Prize

The Brendan Gill Prize was established in 1987 in honor of Brendan Gill by friend and fellow MAS board member Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis along with board members Helen Tucker and Margot Wellington. The Prize is given annually for a work of art created in the previous year—a book, essay, musical composition, play, painting, sculpture, architectural design, film or choreographic piece—that best captures the spirit and energy of New York City.

About Ford Foundation Center for Social Justice and the JustFilms Program

The Ford Foundation Center for Social Justice is a hub for social good and the courageous people who devote their lives to achieving it. The landmark building features 81,000 square feet of convening space for the social sector, and a lush atrium garden and social justice art gallery open to the public.

The Ford Foundation seeks to reduce inequality in all of its forms, and artist-driven documentary and emerging media projects are crucial to this effort. As part of the Creativity and Free Expression program, JustFilms funds social justice storytelling and the 21st-century arts infrastructure that supports it. The projects and people Ford Foundation supports inspire imaginations, disrupt stereotypes, and help transform the conditions that perpetuate injustice and inequality.

Questions?

Contact us at events@mas.org.

Supporters

With the Support of JustFilms | Ford Foundation
  • logo for the Just Films, Ford Foundation