Request for Advocates: 2022 Livable Neighborhoods Program

Applications for LNP will be accepted through June 24

June 2, 2022

MAS invites individuals and organizations to apply for the 2022 Livable Neighborhoods Program. A free program, LNP helps participants educate and engage neighbors in the basics of land use, build capacity for community-based planning, and enhance familiarity with the technical tools and the review processes that shape the built environment in New York City. Applications will be accepted through Friday, June 24, 2022. 

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This year, MAS is seeking applications from community-based advocates interested in developing new skills, exploring the application of web-based planning tools, and interacting with a cohort of leaders from across the city’s five boroughs. The 2022 LNP Cycle will meet every Wednesday evening at 6PM in July virtually via Zoom. We encourage applicants to be available for all scheduled sessions.

Wednesday, July 6

6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Planning together for change:

What makes a neighborhood livable? As a group we will discuss the challenges and opportunities across the city and explore ways to work across neighborhood and borough.

 

Wednesday, July 13

6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Tracking and commenting on new proposals:

An introduction to zoning, environmental and land use review, and how to use the Zoning Application Portal to track and comment on projects in your neighborhood

 

Wednesday, July 20

6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Evaluating needs and risks:

How to use the Equitable Development Data Explorer to advocate for your neighborhood and your neighbors. As a group we will be in conversation about how to address disparities and needs across neighborhoods and different strategies for advocating (including Community District Needs Assessments, local and citywide planning, and budget advocacy)

 

Wednesday, July 27

6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Sharing in the solution:

What makes a city livable?  As a group, we will discuss how our neighborhoods can respond to citywide challenges and while advancing local priorities, the tradeoffs that may be required, and revisit the needs of the most vulnerable New Yorkers.

 

 

MAS is grateful to the National Endowment for the Arts for their ongoing support of LNP. For questions about the program, please contact Spencer Williams, Director of Advocacy at swilliams@mas.org.

Apply Today

  • Volunteers at the Morning Glory Community Garden in the Bronx
    Volunteers at the Morning Glory Community Garden in the Bronx. Photo: MAS Staff.
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  • workshop participants walk down sidewalk
    Mapping creative and cultural assets in Bedford Park
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  • people raise hands at workshop
    LNP workshop in Flatbush
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  • participants join hands at workshop
    Acting out the “spirit of the South Bronx” in Mott Haven
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  • Members consult at a Livable Neighborhoods Workshop
    Members consult at a Livable Neighborhoods Workshop
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  • close up of workshop booklets
    LNP program materials
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comments from Past LNP participants

“I do think one of the things that was most important for me about being a part of the Livable Neighborhoods cohort was not just visibility for myself and our organization, but visibility in terms of understanding who was advocating throughout the city and understanding who else was facing similar issues, and how they were approaching that.”

“Being in a room with other people that were committed to advocating for their neighborhood was really important. It taught me a lot really fast, it inspired me, and it also gave me a sense of community…knowing that people really were within reach that have been concerned about a lot of the same things (as me).”

“The Livable Neighborhoods Program helped us figure out that there were lots of questions we needed to ask, find out exactly where to get information, and how to utilize the public resources that were available right in front of us — everything from city planning website information versus what’s some report that EDC came out with, for some piece of legislation that city council was working on.”